NEW MEXICO WEIRD

++++++++++

 

“Friendly” EMP generator to help protect electronics against electromagnetic attack

Sandia National Laboratories researcher Leonard Martinez connects a high-voltage-insulating line that circulates oil between a coaxial...
Sandia National Laboratories researcher Leonard Martínez connects a high-voltage-insulating line that circulates oil between a coaxial transmission line (white tube on the left) and the blue oil-filled transmission horn. of the EMES machine. (Credit: Sandia National Laboratories/Randy Montoya).

Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) weapons might be a staple of movies and video games, but they pose a very real threat. With just about every facet of modern society reliant on electronic devices, Sandia National Laboratories has developed a “friendly” EMP generator to make sure military and civilian equipment can withstand such potentially devastating bursts of electromagnetic energy.

First studied in earnest during the early US atomic weapon tests in the 1940s and ’50s, an EMP is one weapon of mass destruction that, fortunately, has yet to be used in war or by terrorists. The principle is that detonating a nuclear weapon high in the atmosphere can generate a massive burst of radio energy that can overload electricity grids, and electric and electronic circuits and burn them out.

Over the decades, a lot of research has gone into EMPs and it makes for very unpleasant reading. A single EMP attack against even a country the size of the United States would have a devastating effect. The explosion itself might not pose much danger to those below, but the EMP would damage or destroy phones, power grids, communications networks, computers, laptops, smart cards, vehicle electronics, fuel pumps, medical equipment, industrial robots, and just about anything else that has a microchip or even a slightly advanced electrical circuit.

Worse, large H-bombs aren’t needed to create the pulse. Using magnetic coils, it’s possible to produce EMP effects with tactical nuclear warheads or even conventional explosives that could be fabricated by non-nuclear nations or even non-state hostiles. Microwave devices can also generate similar effects and a large solar flare aimed at the Earth can produce the worst EMP effects of all.

The ElectroMagnetic Environment Simulator (EMES) recently installed at Sandia National Laboratories is designed to deliver variable energy pulses to provide engineers with a better understanding of how EMP damages circuits. As a matter of routine, military-grade equipment is shielded against EMPs, but most civilian equipment up to and including power grids aren’t similarly protected, so devices like Sandia’s EMES are very important in making sure that our bank accounts don’t vanish in a blast of electrons.

According to Sandia, EMES is made up of a “hippopotamus-sized” Marx generator that generates a high-energy pulse from a low-energy DC power source, allowing it to simulate lightning and run high-energy physics experiments. EMES is connected to a large capacitor bank that provides a high-voltage blast every 15 minutes, creating the EMP effect. Meanwhile, absorbers behind the target zone soak up any stray energy from the pulse.

The EMES can produce its pulses within a microsecond of a command. This allows the research team to not just test the hardiness of a device against an EMP, they can also see how the pulse affects the device at any particular moment as it carries out its functions. This will help engineers in building stronger, more sophisticated safeguards.

In addition, the EMES can test a large number of components in a single session as one device can quickly be replaced by another as the generator recharges. If a device passes the EMES tests, it can then be sent on for testing against more aggressive EMP threats and its design improved incrementally.

“The builders or owners generally solicit help from my group when it comes to additional shielding designs,” says Leonard Martínez, the Sandia researcher in charge of the timing and firing control system. “The design focus can range from protecting tiny electronic parts to shielding larger subsystems of military equipment. Our customers may decide to implement additional shielding to their device in between tests, or even take the device back to their lab to design and add additional shielding. Then they would bring it back for retesting.”

EMES is located in a renovated test facility that operated earlier versions of the pulse-producing machine from 1978 to 1994, and was rekindled in the wake of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. In addition to testing both military and civilian devices, researchers at Sandia are looking to integrate the machine into a national testing center that would focus on improving the resilience of the national electricity grid.

Source: Sandia National Laboratories

An audio version of this article is available to New Atlas Plus subscribers.

More audio articles

(For the source of this, and many other interesting articles, please visit: https://newatlas.com/friendly-emp-generator-electronics/57580/)

++++++++++

Game Cam Captures Bear Bathing On Barranca Mesa (Los Alamos)

on July 13, 2018 – 9:31pm

A game cam captures a bear taking a bath earlier this month in the backyard of a home on Kachina Street on Barranca Mesa in Los Alamos, NM.  Photo by Andrew Delorey

(For more interesting Los Alamos related stories visit: https://www.ladailypost.com/content/game-cam-captures-bear-bathing-barranca-mesa/

++++++++++

 

The Insane-Sounding But Totally Real World War II Plot to Bomb Japan With Bats

++++++++++

 

++++++++++

 

Legend of the Miraculous Loretto Chapel Staircase

++++++++++

New Mexico: fossilized tracks point to ice age hunters who tracked giant sloth

Tracks in White Sands national monument suggest hunters tracked 8ft creature with long arms and sharp claws – but it’s unclear why —

 ++++++++++

Wheeler Peak in the Sangre de Cristo Range

New Mexico is 258 years OLDER than “Old” México

New Mexico received its name long before the present-day nation of México won independence from Spain and adopted that name in 1821. Spanish explorers recorded this region as New Mexico (Nuevo México in Spanish) in 1563. In 1581, the Chamuscado and Rodríguez Expedition named the region north of the Río Grande “San Felipe del Nuevo México.” The Spaniards hoped to find wealthy Mexican Indian cultures there similar to those of the Aztec (Mexica) Empire of the Valley of México. The indigenous cultures of New Mexico, however, proved to be unrelated to the Aztecs and were not wealthy. Before statehood, the name “New Mexico” was applied to various configurations of the U.S. Territory, to a Mexican state, and to a province of New Spain, all in the same general area but of varying extensions.

From Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Mexico#Etymology

++++++++++
Map of Estados Unidos de México – 1824
Image result for Map of Estados Unidos de México - 1824

Mapa de los Estados Unidos de México – 1824

++++++++++
New Map of Texas, Oregon, and California – 1840

New Map of Texas, Oregon, and California – 1840

++++++++++
Oregon, Upper California, and New Mexico – 1848

Oregon, Upper California, and New Mexico – 1848

++++++++++
New Mexico’s Territorial Borders – 1852

New Mexico’s Territorial borders in 1852 extended well into modern-day Colorado, included most of Arizona, and all of far-southern Nevada…!

Taos County, for example, extended from Oklahoma all the way to California…!

Bernalillo, Valencia, and Socorro counties extended from Texas to California….!

New Mexico’s Territorial Borders – 1852

++++++++++

1858 – Territory of the United States from the Mississippi River to the Pacific Ocean

++++++++++
Arizona and New Mexico in 1867

 

 

 

 

(Note the size of the various Counties…!)

Arizona and New Mexico in 1867

++++++++++
New Mexico’s Female Buffalo Soldier

After the US Civil War “life for freed slave Cathay Williams was so hard that she disguised herself as a man and enlisted in the U.S. Army, hoping that she could find steady employment serving on the wild New Mexican frontier.”  She changed her name to William Cathay and served in various posts as a “Buffalo Soldier.”  Read about her in the book Forgotten Tales of New Mexico by Ellen Dornan published by The History Press. ArcadiaPublishing.com. ISBN: 978-1609494858. $13.00. 176 pages. 5″x7″.

++++++++++

Acoma Pueblo’s Jewish Governor

“As a young boy growing up in what is now Dortmund, Germany, little Solomon Bibo could never have imagined that the strange path of his life would lead him to become the first and only Jewish governor of an American Indian nation.”

Read about him in the book Forgotten Tales of New Mexico by Ellen Dornan published by The History Press. ArcadiaPublishing.com. ISBN: 978-1609494858. $13.00. 176 pages. 5″x7″.

++++++++++

Mystery Stone, Valencia County

Channel your inner Indiana Jones and visit Mystery Stone, located on State Trust Lands at the base of Hidden Mountain, 16 miles west of Los Lunas. Also known as Los Lunas Decalogue Stone and Commandments Rock, this 80-ton boulder of volcanic basalt bears an inscription which is believed to be an abbreviated version of the Ten Commandments written in Hebrew.

Mystery Stone was first documented in 1933 by University of New Mexico archaeology professor Frank Hibben.  Believers say the carvings could be 2,000 years old; skeptics call Mystery Stone a hoax. Which are you? Visit and decide for yourself.

To access State Trust Lands you must purchase a recreational access permit from the New Mexico State Land Office. Permits cost $35, are good for up to 10 people, and are valid for one year.

Visit www.nmstatelands.org for more information.

You must purchase a Recreational Access Permit from the New Mexico State Land Office to be allowed access to the land where Mystery Stone is located.
 ———-

Publisher’s Note: You may also find the book Los Lunas Mystery Stone and Other Sacred Sites of New Mexico by Donald N. Yates to be of interest.  ISBN-13: 978-0-89540-444-2

++++++++++

Wild Mustangs of Placitas